HomeBlogThe Bedroom Tax: The Unkindest Cut of All?
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  • Anna Hayward January 28, 2013 at 12:01 am

    Don’t forget families who foster – they won’t be able to keep a spare bedrooms to use for those children, thus reducing still further the number of families able to foster, at a time when the government are penalising councils for not finding sufficient foster homes.

    On the other hand, those same families have a perverse incentive to have more birth children as then they’ll be able to keep their larger house without having to move or pay a penalty.

    And if an adult child to a disabled parent decides to stay home, to avoid bedroom tax, woe betides that family if the child is earning – for benefit purposes they’ll then be considered the main earner. I have a friend in this position. Does she pay the bedroom tax or lose income support on account of her adult son moving back home? Either way, she’s going to be on the breadline. It’s not as if she can work to earn more money – she’s one of the lucky ones ATOS decided really was unable to work.

    • murphy January 29, 2013 at 7:40 pm

      If the disabled parent is in receipt of DLA care at any rate then there are no non dependent deductions. This is set to continue with PIP. It’s a little known aspect of housing benefit and a lot of frontline advisors aren’t even aware of it.

    • Neil February 1, 2013 at 6:50 pm

      If there was no door on the bedroom (temporarily removed) then it is open plan and therefore not a separate room thus ineligible for the tax?

  • Michael Astill January 29, 2013 at 1:25 am

    I fully agree that this is a most unfair and ill thought out benefit cut.It is playing lip service to redneck tory right. But I think there is an error or two in the above statement. A serving soldier in the armed forces is unlikely to be in reciept of housing benfit. There is also a discretionary clause for disabled occupancy, but this is at the discretion of the local goverment. In these tough times the local councils will probably not be as lenient or compassionate as the law allows.

  • GEOFF REYNOLDS January 29, 2013 at 2:28 pm

    ITS NICE TO SEE OUR FRIENDS IN SCOTLAND USING THE UNIFIED PEOPLE POWER TO GET THE BACKING OF THE RELEVANT ORGANISATIONS TO TACKLE THIS INJUSTICE HEAD ON. I FEEL PROUD OF YOU.

    Govan Law Centre (GLC) is delighted that Shelter Scotland and the STUC have endorsed the principles of the‘No eviction for bedroom tax’ campaign, which is already supported by local tenants and residents in Glasgow, following two public meetings in Govan.

    bedroomtaxevictionsGLC had suggested the need for urgent minor law reform amendment to implement a ‘No eviction for bedroom tax‘ policy in Scotland, upon the basis the bedroom tax cuts would be affecting tenants within 4 months or so, and Scotland needed a new safety net otherwise we would be unable to prevent evictions based on rent arrears caused by the bedroom tax.

  • Neil February 1, 2013 at 6:49 pm

    If the door on the bedroom is not on the frame then it is open plan and therefore not a separate room thus ineligible for the tax?

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